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Cumberland Connects New Ground Water Source

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Cumberland has increased the capacity of its water system through the construction of a well at Coal Creek Historic Park.

Water from this well is chlorinated at a control building within the park and then travels through a new water main constructed under the western section of Dunsmuir Avenue, known as Camp Road, where it is discharged then into the Village’s water distribution system.

Mayor Baird, Councillor Sproule and Councillor Kishi officially open the Coal Creek well on June 24, 2013.

Mayor Baird, Councillor Sproule and Councillor Kishi officially open the Coal Creek well on June 24, 2013.

“While the bulk of the Village’s water will continue to come from the Cumberland Creek and Perseverance Creek watersheds, this new ground water source will help the Village work toward meeting the Vancouver Island Health Authority’s high standards for water treatment,” said Mayor Leslie Baird. “In the summer months when water levels are low in the watershed reservoirs, more water can be drawn from the Coal Creek well, making for cleaner and safer water for Cumberland residents.”

The new well pump incorporates the use of a variable frequency drive, enabling better control and improved efficiency and therefore less energy to pump the water out of the ground. The project will also contribute to water conservation as the new water main under Dunsmuir Avenue replaced what was likely one of the oldest and leakiest water mains in the Village.

Funds to construct the well and control building came from development cost charges for water infrastructure. Development cost charges are imposed on any new development to fund the capital costs of certain works to service new development. Funding for the new water main under Dunsmuir Avenue came from a combination of federal Community Works Funds, water development cost charges, and water utility revenue.

Find out more about Cumberland’s water system.

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